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Category: extras | sauces | salsa

Flourless Chocolate ‘Cloud’ Cake, and Fair Trade Month

Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.

~ Nelson Mandela

It’s very hard to “walk in another man’s shoes”, to truly understand what it feels to grow up in poverty, without access to many things people in other countries take for granted, such as having food on the table for every meal, having shoes to wear or having more than one pair, having access to healthcare, modern infrastructure, the opportunity to go to school, the possibility to have real chances to change your life for the better…

I remember growing up in Spain during a time when ETA, the Basque terrorist group, was in its full apogee and bomb scares were happening almost every week at our school. Every time we were told that classes were postponed for later in the day or cancelled, I always felt a pang in my heart and remember thinking that I much preferred to have to go to school every single day of the year than getting time off because of bomb threats. I also remember many kids being ecstatic about not having to go to classes; in fact, some of these kids who are obviously now adults, have admitted to calling in many of the threats that resulted to be fake.

[Read more…] »

Fish A-Flying {Halibut en Papillote, Fennel Mashed Potatoes, + Fennel Salad with Roasted Pine Nuts and Mustard-Oil Dressing}

Years ago, I was bitten by a flounder. It’s one of those stories that one can retell with a certain amount of humour and romanticise about, like we do with most of our myopic views of past events. I was working in the Education Department at the Mystic Aquarium and was asked to cover for one of the instructors on vacation. Part of the duties included feeding the fish and various other animals.

In the main education room, which was also used for birthday parties and special catered events, we had a large “touch and feel” tank with various crustaceans, some bivalves and a flounder or two, if I remember correctly.

[Read more…] »

Lemon Honey-Mustard Chicken Thighs

Inspiration can come from anything. Anything at all.

I’m such a reluctant planner, and oftentimes I have hardly any patience in the kitchen. I want to get in and out as quickly as possible. Sort of contradictory, as I love to cook and it relaxes me and makes me lose myself in creative thought.

But lately, with everything that we have going on, including an imminent move, it’s hard to concentrate for too long. Plus, I’m trying to prove to my father that he too can make all these dishes I’m making for us. They really are that easy and simple to make. We’ll see if I am actually successful in my endeavours and he’ll cook for himself…

So the other day, I made this chicken dish which couldn’t be easier to put together and make. I had leftover dressing from a salad (which I’ll share soon) and decided that was the going to be the flavour of the day! Instant inspiration! It includes a slight modification from the salad dressing with the addition of butter and honey to add a little bit of depth. And it uses ingredients that probably most of you regularly have on hand.

Simple. Easy. Quick. Delicious. Father Approved! No planning required. Keeper!

[Read more…] »

Revivals… {Pan-Seared Scallops with Nectarines and Balsamic-Honey-Mustard Reduction + Broccoli Rabe with Golden Garlic}

I drove into town the other day specifically to buy more yarn for the snood I‘m making just finished for myself. The woman at the yarn store said I would have enough with one skein, but well obviously I didn’t quite follow her instructions….

I’ve become completely obsessed enamored with the beautifully produced television series Outlander and its costume design. The Starz original (I sound like an advert) is very truthful to the books – I’ve read five of the eight already – and quite possibly better! While the executive producer Ron Moore is fastidious about keeping all the details from Diana Gabaldon’s novels, he’s also very astute and perceptive by incorporating the personality of the actors and making small modifications, as he did in one of the last episodes where Caitriona Balfe does a singing and dance performance to the tune of Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy, which was a very popular 1940s song. Apparently Cait does a lot of humming and singing when off the set and Ron thought it was a perfect way to include her own personality to enhance the drama. In the books, one knows what Claire is thinking because she’s narrating most of the story. But in the television series, there’s a lot less of that. So, by adding these scenes, we get to experience what it feels like for Claire to be caught between her two worlds, post WWII and the mid-18th century. In my opinion, the result is an improvement on this seductive and mystical story.

[Read more…] »

Spring with Kiko {Chicken a l’Orange + Patatas a lo Pobre}

“Hi little guy. Are you walking your mistress?” asked our friendly neighbour who was raking leaves and preparing his garden for the summer season ahead. Kiko and I were walking by, with the little guy rather dragging me down the hill behind him. (By the way being called mistress was fairly enchanting especially since I’ve been reading the Outlander series, whose story takes place in the 18th century.)

Kiko is my parent’s mini schnauzer. He’s a very affable little thing, although quite prone to being fearful of people. On the other hand, he loves other dogs. Being rather small doesn’t stop him from wanting to greet, sniff and play with all the hounds we encounter on our walks, no matter how large they are. And while he’s generally fun and loving, he is also stubborn. When he digs in his hind legs, there’s no budging him until he gets what he wants, which in most cases is just a stop for him to bury his nose in the ground and mark his territory. Marking his territory takes place what seems like every two seconds though.

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A Frog in Boiling Water & Lamb Shanks

2014: My Annus Horribilis

I will never forget this year. From the beginning to the end, there has been little respite from health and personal issues. But all in all, I’m grateful that my mom is still with us, improving, albeit slowly, and things are moving forward (although currently she’s still in hospital and still in ICU once again). I’ve had the opportunity to spend more time with my parents than I have in the last 10 years, for which I’m grateful. Yes, unfortunately it’s been under a very stressful, painful and heartbreaking situation, but still I’m thankful to be able to be by their side and be able to help them every day.

[Read more…] »

Salisbury Steak with Quick & Easy Paleo Gravy

Although I’d love to say the contrary, there are days or evenings that getting into the kitchen to cook a meal is more of a chore than a pleasure. When that’s the case, I want to make something quick and easy, yet still healthy and Paleo.

The other night was one of those evenings, which tend to happen right after a trip. The house is not spic and span, I’m tired and with a million things on my mind, and concentrating on creating a entire feast for dinner is just not going to happen. I want something that can be done in 30 minutes or less… this recipe is great for a situation like this.

Salisbury steaks are a step up from a hamburger (my original idea) and yet they seem more elaborate.

Bon Appétit!

SALISBURY STEAK WITH QUICK & EASY PALEO GRAVY

Ingredients, for 6 steaks:

800g minced beef
3-4 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon thyme
2 teaspoons herbes de Provence
1 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 egg
butter or fat of preference, for frying

Method:

Mix all of the ingredients together by hand until well blended. Form steak-shaped patties and set aside. You should have about 6 medium-sized patties.

When you’re ready to place the steaks into the gravy, melt some butter or fat of preference in a skillet over medium heat. Brown the steaks on each side. Then transfer to the gravy, as per below instructions.

Ingredients for the Gravy:

3 leeks, cleaned and finely sliced – or – 3 medium onions, julienned – or a mixture of the two
2 tablespoons grass-fed butter or fat of choice
3-4 medium mushrooms, sliced or quartered
1 tablespoon arrowroot powder
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
sea salt, to taste
1/4 cup white wine
1 1/2 – 2 cups filtered water

Method:

In a skillet over low heat, melt the butter or fat of choice. Add the leeks and/or onions and poach until the leeks/onions are tender. Add the mushrooms and sauté about 1-2 minutes. Add the arrowroot powder and sauté 30 seconds.

Then add the white wine and mix well. Cook for a minute and then add the water, first 1 1/2 cups and increase to 2 cups if necessary. Season to taste.

Now add in the browned steaks and cook, turning a couple of times, about 10 minutes. Serve alone or with your favourite side dish.

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“FILETES” SALISBURY CON SALSA GRAVY

Ingredientes, para 6 “filetes”:

800g de carne de ternera picada
3-4 dientes de ajo, picados
1 cucharadita de tomillo
2 cucharaditas de hierbas de la Provenza
1 cucharadita de sal marina, gorda
1/2 cucharadita de nuez moscada
1 huevo
mantequilla o la grasa que prefieras, para freir

Como hacer los “filetes” Salisbury:

Amasa con las manos todos los ingredientes hasta que estén bien mezclados.  Con las manos, haz una hamburguesas en forma de “filete”, o sea, no redondas, sino ovaladas y alargadas. Ponlas en un plato hasta que las vayamos a cocinar.

Cuando la salsa gravy este lista, pon un poco de mantequilla u otra grasa a calentar en una sartén. Doramos los filetes Salisbury por ambos lados y los incorporamos a la salsa gravy, siguiendo las instrucciones de abajo.

Ingredientes para la salsa “gravy”:

3 puerros, limpios y cortados a rodajas finas – o – 3 cebollas, cortadas en juliana
3-4 champiñones medianos, cortados a trozos
2 cucharadas grandes de mantequilla o la grasa que prefieras (como la de pato/ganso/aceite de oliva)
1 cucharada grande de harina de tapioca o arrurruz (tambien se puede usar maicena, pero al ser de maíz es un grano y no es Paleo)
1/4 de cucharadita de pimienta negra, molida
sal, a gusto
1/4 taza (60ml) de vino blanco
1 1/2  – 2 tazas (375ml – 500ml) de agua

Como hacer la salsa:

En una sartén, derrite la mantequilla, y a continuación, pocha los puerros y/o las cebollas hasta que esten tiernos. Añade los champiñones y saltealos unos minutos.

Agrega la harina de tapioca/arrurruz/maicena y frie la unos segundos. Echa le por encima el vino y deja cocer unos minutos. Ahora añade el agua, primero los 375ml, y si hiciera falta, el resto. Mezcla bien y sazona.

Ahora incorporamos los filetes, previamente dorados. Cocemos unos 10 minutos hasta que la salsa espese y los filetes esten hechos por dentro, dando le la vuelta a los filetes de vez en cuando. Se puede servir con puré de patatas, coliflor o la guarnición que nos guste.

Chicken Liver Adobo – Guest Post by Adobo Down Under

I grew up in the south of Spain and had the privilege of attending a DOD school, on the Rota Naval Base. I say privilege because although my father was not military, my brother and I were allowed to go to school on the Base, and most importantly we had the opportunity to experience many things American that we wouldn’t have otherwise, since we both grew up in Spain. (Plus thanks to this, I have a perfect American accent when speaking English! ;))

One of the most important aspects of going to a Department of Defense school, aside from the quality education, is the diversity amongst the students and teachers. There are literally children from everywhere in the world, with mixed backgrounds, mixed races, different religions, and different languages and cultures. So, it’s a beautiful way to grow up without preconceived prejudices. I had friends of all nationalities…and some of my best friends still to this day are Filipino or half-Filipino.

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I remember learning how to make lumpia, eating pancit, longaniza and many other traditional Filipino dishes that I still enjoy today, although less frequently since going Paleo. For me these dishes are part of my teenage years and bring back very fond memories. I even learned some Tagalog, which I have mostly forgotten now, except for some “loanwords” that come from the Spanish language, such as “mesa”.

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Spain has a long history with the Philippines and probably not always a good one, although the Spanish culture seems to have permeated into a number of aspects of the Filipino culture, language and life and vice versa. In Spain, our famous “manton de Manila”, which we claim to be traditional Spanish is something the Spanish conquistadores brought back from the Philippines, just like our “abanico” was brought back possibly from another part of Asia. My great-grandfather fought in the Spanish-American War, and I remember my grandmother telling me stories about his “adventures”.

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So, when I discovered Anna, from Adobo Down Under, in the Sweet Adventures Blog Hop, I was delighted to see that she’s from the Philippines and her blog’s main focus is traditional Filipino food. And although Adobo’s blog is not Paleo, many of her savoury recipes are, and her other recipes can be easily Paleolised. I love to get inspiration from other cuisines around the world and I thought sharing Filipino food from a true Filipino would be inspiring to all of us to try something new, if you are not already familiar with this cuisine.

I’ve mentioned Adobo before on my blog, and how we follow each other on social media. We’ve become blogger buddies and I truly enjoy being witness to and learning from her life musings through what she shares on Instagram and Facebook. It’s always interesting to see how the seasons change in Australia, where Anna and her family live, and how beautiful it must be over there. I have many countries on my wish list, but I’m definitely partial now to visiting Australia and The Philippines… I hope one day I will be that lucky.

In the meantime, I will continue to follow and learn from Anna… and I hope you will too. She has a lovely blog, with beautiful stories, “musings” as she calls them, delicious recipes (which can be easily made into Paleo), and pretty photography.

But I’m sure you’re eager to see an example of her dishes, so without further ado, I leave you with her recipe for today’s post, which is the first guest post on my blog! (We had been planning this for months actually, but Anna has been studying a culinary course, so we had to wait until she was finished and could dedicate time to a post. It’s a true honour to finally be able to feature one of Adobo’s recipes by Anna herself, aside from this one I shared the other day and Paleolised.)

Ah, one last thing…please don’t forget to check her out and follow her on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

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First of all, let me say G’day mate and Mabuhay!

I am Anna – writer, cook, baker and photographer behind the blog Adobo Down Under.  My blog contains musings on parenting, on learning to be Australian and basically engaging my readers into my world –  Filipino raising a family in Sydney Australia.

I’d like to thank The Saffron Girl for the invitation to guest post.  I have never done anything like this, and it has made me excited so much that I could not decide on what Filipino dish to share, considering Debra’s dishes are mostly Paleo.    It had to be something “adobo” as it is a classic in Filipino homes, and I think chicken liver adobo will be perfect.

If you are familiar with the Filipino cuisine, you would know our meals are always served, if not, made with rice.  From breakfast to dinner, from morning tea and snacks to desserts.  This particular dish is usually served with rice.   When I made this and took a photo of the cooked chicken liver adobo, no matter how many garnish, it still looked very unappealing. So I thought reinventing the dish into a simple pate would be the best option.  I hope you like it.

*Note from The Saffron Girl: you can use gluten-free soy sauce in this recipe, of course.

Chicken Liver Adobo – Guest Post by Adobo Down Under
Author: The Saffron Girl
Ingredients
  • 500g chicken liver, washed and trimmed of sinews
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • ½ cup vinegar
  • ½ cup soy sauce (light or dark does not matter, but it will affect the colour of the dish)
  • 2-3 dried bay leaves
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. In a skillet or pan, heat the oil and cook the garlic until soft. Do not brown or burn as it will make the dish bitter.
  2. Add the chicken livers. Stir and cook for 5 minutes.
  3. Add the vinegar, soy sauce and bay leaves and bring to a boil.
  4. Season with salt and pepper. Turn down heat. Simmer for 15-20 minutes.
  5. You can already eat this chicken liver adobo with some rice; or butter some crusty bread slices and serve with some chopped parsley.
  6. To make a simple pate, cool the cooked chicken livers at room temperature.
  7. Process until smooth in a food processor.
  8. Spoon into small bowls or containers and drizzle with olive oil.
  9. Spread the pate on bread slices and serve with chopped parsley.
  10. Best eaten on the day, but can keep in the fridge for 2 days. Just add more olive oil to cover, then wrapped with cling film.
  11. ***
  12. Tips regarding chicken livers:
  13. When buying chicken livers, make sure you buy them fresh. They will be moist with a shiny flesh.
  14. When cleaning chicken livers, make sure to remove white sinews. Remove patches that appear greenish as they will make the dish bitter
  15. Gently rinse in a colander using cold running water
  16. Pat dry with a kitchen towel

 

Ras-el-Hanout Spice Blend

Have you walked through a spice market in the Middle East or a spice souk in Morocco? If you have, you know how your senses go into a whirlwind and don’t know what to focus on. First it’s the wide array of colours, and then the fragrant aromas start to hit you… all at once.

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I personally have to make a halt to control myself from plunging into each sack of spices. When I open a jar of Ras-el-Hanout, I am automatically transported to a spice souk… it’s like all the spices come together in a perfect medley, which is intoxicating and delectable altogether.

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What is Ras-el-Hanout? It’s a delicious and aromatic blend of spices, typically used in the Moroccan cuisine, especially in tagines. You can purchase it ready-made in many supermarkets or online, but nothing will beat a homemade version, with which you can tinker and adjust to your particular palate. Additionally on the plus side of making it at home is that the spices will not loose their intensity, as you can control the amount you want to make based on how often you will use it.

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Ras-el-Hanout encompasses a powerful bouquet of aromas from India, such as cinnamon, cloves and ginger, with native African flavours, and the delicate perfume of lavender and rose petals. It’s a poetic combination, which will add a very unique character to your dishes.

As I use this spice mix quite frequently, I have made enough to last me a few months. Also, I’ve made it a bit less piquant so I have room to expand on the level of heat when cooking. One word of advice: use the freshest of spices you have available, as that will create the most pungent mix.

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The recipe below is an adaptation from the one in Cocina Marroqui by Ghillie Basan.

Ras-el-Hanout Spice Mix
Recipe Type: Spice Mix
Cuisine: Moroccan
Author: The Saffron Girl
Prep time:
Total time:
Makes about 1 cup.
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon whole cloves
  • 1 tablespoon anis seeds
  • 1 tablespoon nigella seeds
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 tablespoon cardamom pods
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger
  • 2 tablespoons ground turmeric
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro seeds
  • 1/2 tablespoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 20 fresh mint leaves, toasted about 5 minutes in the oven at 180C (350F)
  • 2 small guindilla peppers
  • 1 tablespoon edible, dried lavender flowers
  • 20 edible, dried rose petals, crushed
Instructions
  1. Grind all of the ingredients, except the lavender flowers and rose petals, until fine. Depending on your method, the mixture could turn out a bit more coarse or fine.
  2. (I ground my spices in the food processor bowl of my immersion blender. A coffee grinder will probably also work just as well, although you’ll have to do it in batches. A regular food processor may also work. In the worse case scenario, you can hand grind the spices in a mortar and pestle.)
  3. Add the lavender flowers and crushed rose petals to the mixture and blend well.
  4. Place into an airtight container for storage.
  5. This can last for 6 months with the adequate room temperature, although I always use it up way before that time period!

Leek Salad

This salad is usually served as a side dish at our home. But it can be eaten as a main meal or even breakfast, if desired.

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This salad served 4, as a side dish.

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Leek Salad
Recipe Type: Salad
Cuisine: Spanish
Author: The Saffron Girl
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Ingredients
  • 2 large leeks, washed and with some of the top layers taken off (if necessary) and cut into 2-in pieces
  • 1 hard-boiled egg, diced
  • 1 medium tomato, diced
  • olive oil
  • freshly ground pepper and sea salt, to taste
  • herbs for garnishing
Instructions
  1. Steam the leeks until tender.
  2. Drain the water over a colander.
  3. Place the leeks on a serving plate and sprinkle the tomato and egg pieces over top.
  4. Drizzle with olive oil and seasonings.
  5. Garnish with herbs, as desired.
  6. This salad can be eaten warm or cold.

 

How to Freeze Tomatoes

We very ambitiously bought a 5kg box of tomatoes the other day, as my intention was to make gazpacho. But I’ve been distracted with other interesting dishes and haven’t gotten around to it yet. In the meantime, we’ve been using up the tomatoes steadily, but not quite fast enough. And as we are travelling starting this weekend, and I have to use up everything before we go.

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My husband kept requesting that I make a Hollandse Tomatensoep met Balletjes (Dutch tomato soup with meatballs), which I finally did. See the recipe here. But after the soup and the tomato jam, which I made for my shortbread cookie recipe, we still had a lot of tomatoes left! arggghh.. but good argghh. 😉

When speaking with my mother about her tomato soup recipe, I explained my dilemma. Of course, mothers know best, right?  Especially mothers like my own, who are great cooks and very economising in the kitchen. She told me to freeze the tomatoes for later use! Uh, duh.. why hadn’t I thought of that before?

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Anyway, she’s promised to give me her “how to freeze” vegetable book, which she no longer needs or uses.. so I’ll be learning more about this and how and which vegetables are good for freezing.

In the meantime, I took care of my extra tomatoes. This couldn’t be easier! And it’s also a great idea for when tomatoes are in season, to buy them in bulk, freeze them and use during the winter.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • glass or plastic, sealable containers for the freezer (or plastic ziplock bags can also work)
  • a large pot
  • water
  • a knife
  • tomatoes (of course, since we are freezing them, right?)

Please see the “recipe” below for instructions.

How to Freeze Tomatoes
Author: The Saffron Girl
Ingredients
  • glass or plastic, sealable containers for the freezer (or plastic ziplock bags can also work)
  • a large pot
  • water
  • a knife
  • tomatoes (of course, since we are freezing them, right?)
Instructions
  1. Depending on the number of tomatoes you have, you may have to do this in batches.
  2. Take a large pot and fill with filtered water.
  3. Over high heat, bring to a boil.
  4. Turn heat off.
  5. Carefully place the tomatoes inside the water, one by one, with the help of a ladle if necessary, so you don’t get burned.
  6. Let the tomatoes sit in the water for about 10 minutes.
  7. Then pour the contents out over a colander.
  8. Allow the tomatoes to cool enough for handling with your bare hands.
  9. With a knife, peel the tomatoes. This is super easy, since the tomatoes are now “blanched”.
  10. Figure out how many tomatoes you want to place in each container. I used 6 per container.
  11. Cut the tomatoes in half and with your hands slightly squeeze out any juice.
  12. Place into the container, seal and freeze.
  13. They can last months in the freezer.
  14. Simply thaw out when ready to use.

 

Paleo Shortbread & Tomato-Honey Jam Cookies – SABH

“Who stole the cookie from the cookie jar?” …

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It’s that time of month again…to join in on the fun of recipe exchanges with the Sweet Adventures Blog Hop! I love the creativity and enthusiasm I find in all the participants; and very much enjoy being part of this special group.

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If you’re a blogger, you too can join! Just check out the instructions at the bottom of this page for all of the information.

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I’ve missed a few SABH lately and I really didn’t want to miss August’s “Cookie Monster” hop. So, I created this cookie especially for this event.

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Why tomatoes?

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Well, we bought a box of  5kg the other day and I need to use them up! In fact, I’m making a Dutch tomato soup, by special request from my husband, tonight, and I’m blanching and freezing up the rest for later use.

Paleo Shortbread & Tomato-Honey Jam Cookies
Recipe Type: Dessert
Author: The Saffron Girl
Serves: 10
Makes 10 cookies/biscuits.
Ingredients
  • For the shortbread:
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon raw honey
  • 1 1/4 cups ground almonds (almond flour)
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt
  • For the tomato jam:
  • 6 medium tomatoes
  • 3/4 cup raw honey
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeesed orange juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • freshly ground rosemary (optional)
Instructions
  1. For the shortbread:
  2. Place the butter and honey in the food processor and pulse until smooth and creamy.
  3. Add the rest of the ingredients and pulse until a dough is formed.
  4. Create a ball or sausage with the dough and cover with a piece of parchment paper.
  5. Freeze for about 30 minutes.
  6. Bring out of the freezer and let stand 10 minutes before using the dough.
  7. On a sheet of parchment (or the same one used to freeze), roll out the dough with a rolling pin.
  8. Cut out desired shapes and transfer the cookies with a spatula to a a cookie sheet covered with a sheet of parchment paper.
  9. Bake at 180C (350F) for 6-8 minutes on the bottom rack. Remove from oven and let cool before touching, so they can harden.
  10. For the tomato jam:
  11. Peel the tomatoes with a sharp knife. (You can also scald them in water; but I personally find it easy to simply peel this small amount.)
  12. Cut the tomatoes into small chunks and place them in a medium sized pot.
  13. Add the honey and orange juice.
  14. Over low heat, cook for 25 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  15. Add the ground cinnamon and nutmeg and mix well.
  16. Cook 5 minutes longer.
  17. Remove from heat and allow to completely cool.
  18. You can either keep the jam with chunks or puree it with an immersion blender for a smoother spread. Strain if desired. (I kept mine with chunks, as it gives it a more rustic feel.)
  19. Pour into a jar and refrigerate.
  20. For using the jam with the cookies, make sure you refrigerate at least an hour before applying to the cookies. Overnight is better.
  21. To assemble:
  22. Place about 2 teaspoons of the jam on a “whole” cookie.
  23. And place the cookie with a “hole” on top.
  24. Sprinkle with some ground rosemary, if desired.
  25. Repeat until you have completed with all the cookies.
  26. NOTE: You can add more flavour to these cookies for other recipes by adding in the dough one of the following, for example: rosemary, edible lavender, sesame seeds, or even chopped up nuts.

 

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The Sweet Adventures Blog Hop, or SABH, is brought to you by 84th & 3rd and monthly Guest Hostesses.

The August 2013 ‘Cookie Monster’ hop is open for linkup until 11:59 pm, Friday 23 August [AEST Sydney time].

IMPORTANT – The instructions below cover how to link up but if you aren’t sure of something don’t hesitate to ask! Detailed instructions can be seen here. Remember, SABH is open to all food bloggers but only new posts published after the hop goes live can be linked up.

  1. Add a link to this post somewhere in your post. You won’t be able to link up in the hop without a ‘backlink’ to this hostess post included in your post.
  2. Click here for the Thumbnail List code – Copy the code and add it to the bottom of your post in HTML view.
  3. Click here to Enter the Hop – Make sure to do this step so you appear in the list too! Add the link to your SABH post (NOT your homepage). Your entry will be submitted when you click ‘crop’ on your photo.

Use the #SABH hashtag to tell the world about your post! You can follow us on Twitter: @SweetAdvBlogHop and on Facebook /SweetAdventuresBlogHop for new hop announcements and general deliciousness. Thanks for joining!

This is a Blog Hop!

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