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Tag: Travel

Once Upon A Table {Two Calamari Recipes – Papas con Chocos & Habas con Chocos}

I’ve not posted anything since last year November, so first things first: Happy New Year 2016 & Happy Chinese New Year! May it bring us all good health, happiness, and prosperity.

Yesterday the air was crisp, and the sky was so blue it seemed as if someone had taken a brush to paint it just perfectly so. There was not a cloud in sight. And the sunshine was so warm that it encouraged me to take off my jacket and walk about in short sleeves, something that normally at 14C I wouldn’t be doing. As Kiko (our mini schnauzer) and I got closer to the forrest we go through every day, we were greeted by yellow and blue butterflies bouncing around us and a couple of tiny little birds, whose feathers were iridescent in the rays of the sun, and who startled by our steps flew quickly away, chirping. I had the fleeting sensation of being in a Disney fairytale …

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Autumn in Florida {Pumpkin Pottage with Kale, MahiMahi and Bacon}

Florida vs London

The rain was coming down in torrential buckets after the stifling heat of the day, enticing my curiosity to go outside and observe nature in the tropics. In Florida the rain is different to that in London, where moments before I had been transported by the prologue of the book I’ve just started, Capital. Here at this latitude, it is almost always accompanied by a fanfare of thunder and cracking that makes one realise the heavens can be quite ferocious and nature has no friends (as we say in Spain).

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Courgetti {Zucchini Noodles} Without the Need of a Spiraliser

Courgetti! What a cool sounding term. One of those neologisms that simply clicks from the moment one hears it. Paleo (and the culinary world) has a lot of them, since many recipes have been adapted or paleolised (that being a newly invented word in itself).

I first heard the expression coined by my friend Ceri, who is a natural chef and the author of the Natural Kitchen Adventures blog and I just couldn’t get over how easily it rolled off the tongue. Why hadn’t I thought of it? I kept calling them courgette noodles or zucchini spaghetti. How dull and uninventive. Coincidently, Ceri just celebrated her fourth year of blogging by sharing a courgetti recipe!

I’ve been meaning to share this recipe for some time now, but every time I’ve made it I’ve not been able to photograph the dish. My mother requested it often; and I love how easy and simple it is. It can be whipped up in literally less than ten minutes from start to finish. And it always comes out perfect; so it’s a great side dish or something really quick to make in the mornings for breakfast with eggs!

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Stratford-upon-Avon and Some English Lessons, The Cotswolds Part I

It’s been a while since I’ve written an entry in my Travel Logs. And although we travel frequently, I generally don’t have the time to indulge in doing a proper write-up about many of our trips, which was one of my original intentions with this blog. But a few weekends ago, we made an excursion that deserves a break in my routine so I may share with you a little bit about what we saw, experienced, and most importantly discovered.

For me, one of the most interesting facets about travelling is what I learn, things that I probably would never retain otherwise or would not affect me in the same manner, had I not experienced them first-hand and in person. And since we are living in England, it would be a crime to not visit the Cotswolds or the birthplace of who is considered the most influential and important writer in the history of the English language, Shakespeare.

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William Shakespeare

The weekend had a few highlights for us, aside from the trip and landscape themselves. One, we had a fantastic, well-informed guide at the Anne Hathaway cottage in Straford-upon-Avon, from whom we learned where a few ordinary English language terms originated; two, driving through this beautiful part of the countryside made us experience what is simply quintessentially English – the thatched roofed cottages, the lovely country roads large enough only for one car, the pretty English gardens filled with roses, and tearoom after tearoom; and last, we were once again educated by an extremely entertaining and well-informed guide, Tabitha, at the Roman Baths in the city of Bath.

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Speaking of those narrow English country roads, I kept imagining myself in a vintage British convertible, with a scarf wrapped around my head flowing in the wind, and some romantic music playing in the background, while we slowly but steadily made our way from village to village….sometimes, I could also imagine myself riding in an old Land Rover, my most favourite car, driving up to my Georgian manor surrounded by acres of farm land scattered with sheep, and my adorable Rufus waiting to greet me…

It’s so easy to create dreams when visiting the Cotswolds.

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Rufus was our Saint Bernard, when I was growing up in Spain. He and Fritzy, our crazy German Shepherd, loved to jump into the back of my father’s Land Rover and head to the beach. Rufus was such a big, loving dog (and I was such a little girl), that sometimes I rode him like a horse. The Cotswolds brought back a longing for living on a farm and having animals around me that I had thought was not possible anymore. I’ll have to work on that dream becoming real!

Anyway, back to the reality of the trip…

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Shakespeare’s Birthplace, as seen from the Gardens

The Cotswolds can be done in two days, as we did; however, I would suggest either more days to really linger, or going back frequently, as we intend to do.

We started off our journey in Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare’s birthplace, home to his family, and later where he died. There are five houses connected to his life and death and they all belong to the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, which has renovated and preserved them for all of us to be able to experience this exciting part of English (and world) history.

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Views of Shakespeare’s Birthplace

William Shakespeare is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language; he was a poet, playwright and dramatist; and stepping into the past and walking “in his footsteps” is somewhat magical.

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The first house we visited was Shakespeare’s birthplace, which is located in the center of town, on Henley Street. His father, John, was a successful businessman and glover, who also served as town mayor. His mother, Mary Arden, was the daughter of an affluent landowning farmer, and her house is part of the Shakespeare’s Houses & Gardens, which we however did not visit and plan to return to see. The tickets allow for re-entry within a year, like many of the National Trust properties do as well. So, if you’re a local or live close enough like us, it’s a great deal of which to take advantage.

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John’s business afforded the family an affluent upbringing and William had a “good life” and later through his line of work, met and befriended very influential people, and expanded his fortune enough to finance several properties, including the second largest house in Stratford during his time, New Place. The birthplace is somewhat of a higgledy-piggledy set of rooms, which shows how the house was expanded upon throughout the life of its occupants into what is visible today and is an attractive timbered house from the outside. On the inside, you can visit the ground and first floors, the kitchen and gardens. It’s a must-see to understand how life was during the Middle Ages in England. It must have been quite dark with only candles creating some light and the windows being so small. Outside in the garden, costumed actors were performing excerpts from Shakespeare’s plays. It’s definitely worth taking a seat on one of the benches, enjoying their art and being transported into another era…and maybe start dreaming again.

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Nash’s House

The next house on our tour was Nash’s House & New Place. Shakespeare bought New Place in 1597 and this was the second largest home in Stratford during his time. He lived in it with his family when he was not in London, and this is where he died in 1616. New Place is no longer standing; only the foundations are visible on the grounds, which is now the garden part of   Nash’s House. Nash’s House was named after Thomas Nash, the first husband of Shakespeare’s granddaughter, and a wealthy landowner. It’s a well-preserved Tudor building with a beautiful, traditional knot garden in the back. Don’t miss out on visiting the garden and the green expanse behind it, as it’s actually quite impressive to see how large it is for a property in the center of town. Apple trees line part of the knot garden, which must be even lovelier to see during the summer when the flowers are in bloom.

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From Nash’s House, we walked down Church Street towards Hall’s Croft, the home of Shakespeare’s daughter Susanna and her husband, Dr. John Hall, the town’s wealthy doctor. The house has features, which show off their wealth, such as stone flooring, large stone fireplaces, and beautiful exposed timber beams facing the street (so people walking by could be witness to their economic status). It’s a grand house by 16th century (and even today’s) standards. The gardens are very pretty and include a variety of herbs that were most likely used by Susanna’s husband in his medicinal potions. (Personally, I would love a garden like this for my culinary needs, as I keep killing off my herbs on the windowsill.)

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Hall’s Croft, house, interior, and gardens

A short walk from Hall’s Croft is Holy Trinity Church, which is where Shakespeare was baptised and later interred. At the feet of the high altar, you can see the graves of William, his wife, and his daughters as well as as that of John Hall, his son-in-law. Shakespeare and Anne had three children. Susanna was born only about six months after they were rapidly married, when Anne was 26 and William only 18! And then they had twins, Hamnet and Judith. Hamnet died at age 11 of unknown causes. Back then the cause of death was not recorded unless it was part of a coroner’s report. But as the plague was still rampant, it’s quite possible that could’ve been the cause… but we’ll never know for sure. Shakespeare himself survived the plague as an infant, but his death at the approximate age of 52 was also due to unknown causes, very possibly due to some infection or disease for which medicine back then had no cure. As Shakespeare did not want his body to be examined or exhumed, he supposedly placed a curse, which can be read on the epitaph of his gravestone, on anyone trying to remove his bones from this location. So we will probably never know for sure what caused his death; on the positive side and for tourism in Stratford-upon-Avon, this curse most likely saved us from seeing his grave site transferred to Westminster Abbey in London.

(By the way, we learned that there are no direct descendants of William and Anne alive today. However, Anne Hathaway’s family flourished and one of her brother’s descendants lived in her house until 1899.)

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Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon

A walk behind the church takes you to the banks of the River Avon, which is lined with beautifully trimmed weeping willows. A number of locations offer boat rides along the river…something we’ll try to enjoy on our next visit. Again, it was so easy to imagine sitting on a boat, with my husband wearing a stripped jacket and straw hat and rowing away, as I coquettishly hold my parasol to protect me against the rays of the afternoon sun…

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River Avon

Our last stop in Stratford was Anne Hathaway’s cottage. The house and 90-some-acre property were first leased by Anne’s grandfather and later purchased and passed down to family members until the late 1800s, when the property was purchased by the Trust. The cottage started off as a two-room house with very high ceilings and a fireplace in the middle of the main room. It was later expanded by Anne’s eldest brother and is a lovely example of a thatched Tudor cottage, with somewhat messy, but enchanting English grass gardens, an apple orchard and a vegetable plot. It’s truly a romantic sight!

And it was here that we learned a few things about how some English words came into being and how life transpired during Tudor times. In the main room of the house, what today would be considered the sitting/dining room all together, there’s a fine example of a dining table, commissioned by Anne’s grandfather and used until the house was handed over to the Trust in 1899. The table may not seem like much to us today, but it’s a beautifully crafted piece of furniture, which has a table top or board that is “convertible” or which can be flipped around. The practical reason for this feature is that Tudor people were messy and dirty eaters, eating with their hands and allowing things to drop off of their “tranches” or plates, therefore not only getting the floors (and their clothes) dirty, but also scratching and getting the table top dirty and greasy. However, this same table would serve as a place to play card games with the family and guests, so by flipping it over to the “prettier” side for that purpose, it was always kept presentable. The man of the house sat at the head of the table in a chair with arms, whilst the women and children sat on armless chairs or stools. Since the man sat at the head of the table, then called board, he was considered the “chairman of the board”…and this is how this term originated! Isn’t that cool or what? And wait there’s more… when playing cards, it was considered foul play to place your hands below the board/table since that way one could cheat. Hence, the term “above the board” was coined meaning that everything, hands included, and especially morals, were to be kept above the board and visible to all.

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Anne’s cottage may not seem today like it was the home of a well-to-do family, but if you look closely, you will see signs of Anne’s family’s affluence and wealth, such as the stone floors, large stone fireplaces and the bedrooms, which included guest beds. Beds were reserved for the wealthier folk and for guests, and were made of straw “mattresses”, which were not often cleaned or replaced and included the ubiquitous little bed mites. The mattress lay upon a criss-cross stringed bed slate that had to be tightened every so often. So, therefore the other phrase: “sleep tight and don’t let the bed bugs bite” came into being.

We learned a few other intriguing pieces of historical information, which were of particular interest for me, since I obviously love to cook. Food was served on “tranches” or wooden plates. Tranche comes from the French word “piece”, as referred to a piece of wood or even further back in history, a piece of bread, upon which food was served. The tranches were being constantly carved out of wood by the family’s on-staff carpenter and when a tranche got particularly greasy and full of grime, it was simply tossed into the fire and replaced with a new, clean one. The tranche is square in shape, with a small little indentation in the upper corner, where salt was placed to condiment one’s food. The lady of the house was the keeper of the rock salt, as it was a very valuable condiment during those times. The eldest son was mostly likely the child in charge of grinding up some salt every day, which he later gave to his mother, and who in turn shared with the family and guests, allocating an amount of salt that fit in her pinched fingers, called a “pinch of salt,” to each diner.

The stove was literally kept running all day and night with a pot constantly cooking. This dish, if we can call it as such, was called potage, from the French word as well meaning stew, porridge or a thick soup. Remember back then, those who could read and write mostly spoke French, which was the language of the conquering Normans. These words dwindled down into the regular folk as well. The potage could include any type of meat and vegetables and as it was constantly cooking and not often cleaned out, another phrase “piss pot in, piss pot out” was coined meaning “garbage in, garbage out.”

Chicken, by the way, was considered a very special treat and quite expensive. The animals were kept primarily for laying eggs, and therefore eating a chicken was translated into the loss of a valuable source of eggs.

Nothing was wasted in those times, including the ashes from the oven and fireplaces, which was used to make toothpaste and soap. Of course, back then they didn’t clean their teeth, which they did with their fingers as no toothbrushes existed, on a daily basis as we do, nor did they bathe but about once a year. When bathing day came around, usually when Spring arrived and a new set of clothes was freshly put out, a big bathtub was filled with water and the man of the house went in first, followed by the lady of the house and the children, with the youngest one being last. By the time the youngest or the baby was put into the bath, the water was so full of grime from the rest of the family, that is was dark…so, “don’t throw the baby out with the bath water” takes on a real meaning. 😉

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It sounds kind of yucky if you really envision it! I prefer to keep it on the romantic level, rather than think about how this particular English phrase came about. The thing is Anne’s family was not poor and they did enjoy a number of luxuries, as well as were very well fed and healthy for their time. In fact, since Anne’s family was affluent, they would have given their food scraps to the poor, after scrapping it off their tranches with some bread. The bread and all went to these less lucky souls.

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They had a working farm, which supplied them with all their necessities and land for their sheep, making them successful in the wool trade through which most likely Anne’s father and William’s father met creating a family and business bond. Their farm was planted with all of the seasonal, local vegetables and fruits they required… but there’s one vegetable they would’ve not eaten, and that is the potato! When the potato was introduced into England in the 16th century, it took some time before it was considered an article of food. As it grows underground, it became associated with the Devil. In fact, young men would try to show their virility by wearing a potato on a string around their necks, thereby demonstrating to the world (and especially young women) that they were not afraid of the Devil. However, they rather became the laughing stock of people, and Shakespeare makes reference to this his play, “Merry Wives of Windsor”.

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As you see, our visit to Stratford-upon-Avon was quite fruitful in terms of English terminology, which seems quite fitting given this is the birthplace of Shakespeare, and learning a few things about living and eating during Tudor times.

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Our trip continued on to the lovely, honey-coloured villages of the Cotswolds and onto the Unesco World Heritage Site of the city of Bath… but I’ll leave all that for my next travel log.

Chicken Liver Adobo – Guest Post by Adobo Down Under

I grew up in the south of Spain and had the privilege of attending a DOD school, on the Rota Naval Base. I say privilege because although my father was not military, my brother and I were allowed to go to school on the Base, and most importantly we had the opportunity to experience many things American that we wouldn’t have otherwise, since we both grew up in Spain. (Plus thanks to this, I have a perfect American accent when speaking English! ;))

One of the most important aspects of going to a Department of Defense school, aside from the quality education, is the diversity amongst the students and teachers. There are literally children from everywhere in the world, with mixed backgrounds, mixed races, different religions, and different languages and cultures. So, it’s a beautiful way to grow up without preconceived prejudices. I had friends of all nationalities…and some of my best friends still to this day are Filipino or half-Filipino.

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I remember learning how to make lumpia, eating pancit, longaniza and many other traditional Filipino dishes that I still enjoy today, although less frequently since going Paleo. For me these dishes are part of my teenage years and bring back very fond memories. I even learned some Tagalog, which I have mostly forgotten now, except for some “loanwords” that come from the Spanish language, such as “mesa”.

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Spain has a long history with the Philippines and probably not always a good one, although the Spanish culture seems to have permeated into a number of aspects of the Filipino culture, language and life and vice versa. In Spain, our famous “manton de Manila”, which we claim to be traditional Spanish is something the Spanish conquistadores brought back from the Philippines, just like our “abanico” was brought back possibly from another part of Asia. My great-grandfather fought in the Spanish-American War, and I remember my grandmother telling me stories about his “adventures”.

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So, when I discovered Anna, from Adobo Down Under, in the Sweet Adventures Blog Hop, I was delighted to see that she’s from the Philippines and her blog’s main focus is traditional Filipino food. And although Adobo’s blog is not Paleo, many of her savoury recipes are, and her other recipes can be easily Paleolised. I love to get inspiration from other cuisines around the world and I thought sharing Filipino food from a true Filipino would be inspiring to all of us to try something new, if you are not already familiar with this cuisine.

I’ve mentioned Adobo before on my blog, and how we follow each other on social media. We’ve become blogger buddies and I truly enjoy being witness to and learning from her life musings through what she shares on Instagram and Facebook. It’s always interesting to see how the seasons change in Australia, where Anna and her family live, and how beautiful it must be over there. I have many countries on my wish list, but I’m definitely partial now to visiting Australia and The Philippines… I hope one day I will be that lucky.

In the meantime, I will continue to follow and learn from Anna… and I hope you will too. She has a lovely blog, with beautiful stories, “musings” as she calls them, delicious recipes (which can be easily made into Paleo), and pretty photography.

But I’m sure you’re eager to see an example of her dishes, so without further ado, I leave you with her recipe for today’s post, which is the first guest post on my blog! (We had been planning this for months actually, but Anna has been studying a culinary course, so we had to wait until she was finished and could dedicate time to a post. It’s a true honour to finally be able to feature one of Adobo’s recipes by Anna herself, aside from this one I shared the other day and Paleolised.)

Ah, one last thing…please don’t forget to check her out and follow her on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

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First of all, let me say G’day mate and Mabuhay!

I am Anna – writer, cook, baker and photographer behind the blog Adobo Down Under.  My blog contains musings on parenting, on learning to be Australian and basically engaging my readers into my world –  Filipino raising a family in Sydney Australia.

I’d like to thank The Saffron Girl for the invitation to guest post.  I have never done anything like this, and it has made me excited so much that I could not decide on what Filipino dish to share, considering Debra’s dishes are mostly Paleo.    It had to be something “adobo” as it is a classic in Filipino homes, and I think chicken liver adobo will be perfect.

If you are familiar with the Filipino cuisine, you would know our meals are always served, if not, made with rice.  From breakfast to dinner, from morning tea and snacks to desserts.  This particular dish is usually served with rice.   When I made this and took a photo of the cooked chicken liver adobo, no matter how many garnish, it still looked very unappealing. So I thought reinventing the dish into a simple pate would be the best option.  I hope you like it.

*Note from The Saffron Girl: you can use gluten-free soy sauce in this recipe, of course.

Chicken Liver Adobo – Guest Post by Adobo Down Under
Author: The Saffron Girl
Ingredients
  • 500g chicken liver, washed and trimmed of sinews
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • ½ cup vinegar
  • ½ cup soy sauce (light or dark does not matter, but it will affect the colour of the dish)
  • 2-3 dried bay leaves
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. In a skillet or pan, heat the oil and cook the garlic until soft. Do not brown or burn as it will make the dish bitter.
  2. Add the chicken livers. Stir and cook for 5 minutes.
  3. Add the vinegar, soy sauce and bay leaves and bring to a boil.
  4. Season with salt and pepper. Turn down heat. Simmer for 15-20 minutes.
  5. You can already eat this chicken liver adobo with some rice; or butter some crusty bread slices and serve with some chopped parsley.
  6. To make a simple pate, cool the cooked chicken livers at room temperature.
  7. Process until smooth in a food processor.
  8. Spoon into small bowls or containers and drizzle with olive oil.
  9. Spread the pate on bread slices and serve with chopped parsley.
  10. Best eaten on the day, but can keep in the fridge for 2 days. Just add more olive oil to cover, then wrapped with cling film.
  11. ***
  12. Tips regarding chicken livers:
  13. When buying chicken livers, make sure you buy them fresh. They will be moist with a shiny flesh.
  14. When cleaning chicken livers, make sure to remove white sinews. Remove patches that appear greenish as they will make the dish bitter
  15. Gently rinse in a colander using cold running water
  16. Pat dry with a kitchen towel

 

Not Quite Icelandic Fish Soup

I have been mesmerised for days in the world of other bloggers and websites. One could almost say I have become obsessed; I’m doing research for changes that I want to make to this blog and the more I look, the more confused and overwhelmed I seem to get. My mind is doing summersaults, I go to bed thinking about layouts and wake up thinking about designs…and then there is the price factor. You have choices from a full-design by a web designer (which can be a lot of money but would save me all the hassle and time) or do-it-yourself options that would give me great satisfaction to produce, but that are not free in most cases, as there’s never a perfect template or platform to accommodate my needs. I want it all! A pretty site, a functional site and one that engages all of us, you and me.

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You may ask why I’m seeking out other sites when I’m also a graphic designer. But as we say in Spain, «en casa de herrero azadón de palo», which translates to “in the house of the metal-worker, a wooden hoe is used” because he either doesn’t have the time to attend to his own matters or doesn’t have the creativity to do so. Well, I’m way too subjective and am having trouble deciding on so many items, that I needed to do the research and also reach out to other designers.

In the midst of all this information overload and what I am sure is driving a number of designers and people crazy with all my questions and indecisions, I  haven’t been taking care of myself in the Paleo way. I feel like an artiste on a mission, who forgets to eat, wash or comb his/her hair… I can just envision myself like a Jack Pollock or a slightly entranced Da Vinci… thankfully, my husband is travelling and not witness to any of this!

However, on this journey through cyberspace, I’ve discovered some blogs that are simply gorgeous. And I don’t just mean their look, but the content. One of these such blogs is Mimi Thorisson’s Manger.  Over the past few days, I’ve come to know Mimi and her life, which is truly enviable. Her stories are enchanting, soothing and have a “je ne sais quoi” about them.. maybe because she’s half-French, is living in Medoc in the countryside, and everything seems so idyllic.

Her husband is a professional photographer and apparently takes all of the photos for the blog. They are impressive and inviting. And her recipes are simply delightful. One in particular caught my eye because of the title: Icelandic Fish Soup. Mimi’s husband is Icelandic.

I have been to Iceland twice, but I think I sort of travelled there before then as a child in my dreams. My father used to go there often because of his job, and brought me back a hand-made cloth viking doll, which I treasured for years. It’s still somewhere to be found at my parent’s house, I’m sure. Reading Mimi’s post brought back childhood memories and real memories of my trips to this island-country.

I always imagined the “land of fire and ice” to be a cold place, up in the northern hemisphere with inhospitable people… but I couldn’t have been more wrong. Well, partially wrong. It is a cold place. But it could be colder actually if it weren’t for the currents of the gulf stream, which bring warmer air from Africa up to Iceland.

The two times I visited were in November; so it was dark most of the day. The sun rises about 10:30 in the morning, although it really never goes far above the horizon, and it goes back down around 3:30 or 4:00pm. The play of light is surreal and magical, just like Iceland itself.

There’s so much I could write and describe about my experience in this intriguing country, one where people do not really have last names. Okay they do, but in order to find them in a phone book, you need to know the father’s first name, then know if the person is a man or a woman which determines the ending of the “last name”, plus they are listed by first names! For example, Thorisson is the son of Thori, but Thori’s daughter’s last name would be Thorisdottir (with a little accent on the “o”). It’s a country to which I’d love to return, this time during the warmer months to see the different colours of summer.

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Whilst reading Mimi’s blog, I came across this recipe for Icelandic fish soup and felt like it was just the right thing to bring me out of my artistic reverie and trance.

Below is my version of the soup, which has warmed up my tummy and brought me back to life….

 

Not Quite Icelandic Fish Soup
Recipe Type: Main
Cuisine: Icelandic
Author: The Saffron Girl
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4-6
Serves 4-6
Ingredients
  • 4-5 tablespoons butter (I used Kerrygold)
  • 2 medium red onions, julienned
  • 3 cloves garlic, quartered lengthwise
  • 1 celery stalk, finely sliced
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 1/4 cup moscatel or sherry
  • 6 cups filtered water
  • 2 small tomatoes, peeled and chopped
  • 4 parsnips, peeled and chopped (about 1-inch pieces)
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1/8 teaspoon saffron powder or a few sprigs of saffron, plus a few additional sprigs for garnishing
  • 1 teaspoon coarse sea salt, or sea salt to taste
  • some freshly ground pepper
  • 6 hake steaks, cubed (I used frozen fish, about 4 cups cubed)
  • thyme for garnishing, optional
Instructions
  1. In a large pot over low heat, melt the butter with the onions, garlic and celery. Poach (cook on very low heat) for 10 minutes, until the vegetables are tender.
  2. Add the white wine and moscatel/sherry and reduce about 3-4 minutes.
  3. Add the tomatoes, filtered water, saffron, vinegar and parsnips. Cook for 20-25 minutes until the parsnips are tender.
  4. Add sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste. I added 1 teaspoon of salt, but needed a bit more on my plate later.
  5. With a potato masher, very slightly and roughly squash the soup a bit, so that the parsnip pieces are not whole. But do not puree the soup.
  6. Add the fish pieces and cook 8-10 minutes until the fish is done.
  7. Serve immediately, garnishing with some saffron sprigs and thyme, if desired.

 

Green Papaya Salad (Nom Xoai Xanh)

We visited Vietnam last year. I think it’s one of those places that does not leave you indifferent on many levels. The clash of modernisation with colonial vestiges from Chinese, French and even American influences and the native culture are sometimes perplexing. One example is that we were driven from the Hanoi airport to our hotel in a car that had wifi onboard, while on the side of the main highway, we drove past people with traditional clothing – and yes, the Vietnamese hat – working on the rice fields, had to avoid cattle crossing the road, and nearly missed a few accidents with mopeds carrying two, three people and sometimes even a whole dining room table! To see a glimpse of our time in this beautiful country, please view my travel log on Vietnam.

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This incredible experience, from which I learned a lot about human history and how things are perceived depending on whose perspective we are looking upon something (French and Americans are called invaders in northern Vietnam, and the Chinese are also considered such but on a different level) left me with a lasting impression and a need to return that I hope to fulfill one day.

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Part of the richness of our adventurous time in Vietnam was trying all the delicious food available and visiting the markets. Breakfast in the Asian countries I’ve visited consists mostly of a warm soup, such as Vietnamese Pho. Hanoi came to life each day we were there with everyone preparing and eating Pho or some other form of street food, while the shops slowly but energetically opened up, women balancing baskets on their shoulders headed to the market or were selling their wares on the street, and the silence of the night was thoroughly disrupted by an incessant noise that lasts until very late in the evening.

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(grating the green papaya with the kitchen utensil that the Hanoi Cooking Centre gave me)

(Vietnam, although a one-party Communist country, is one of Asia’s fastest growing economies. In fact, if you were unaware of the political regime, you would think you are in a Capitalist nation, since it seems that everyone owns their own shop. Stores occupy the bottom part of almost every building in Hanoi and even in many areas of the countryside.)

Pho is one thing I need to make at home, but haven’t yet because I need to find a butcher that will sell me really good quality, grass-fed beef and have it very thinly sliced. I plan a visit to the London Borough Market soon… so I’ll be shopping for my ingredients, making Pho and sharing the recipe with all of you.

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Ah.. the recipe! Well, while in Hanoi, I took a cookery course with the Hanoi Cooking Centre. I had just started my blog and had never done anything like this, while on vacation. So, the idea was exciting and intriguing. I took a taxi to the school from our hotel, thinking I couldn’t manage the streets… one must cross the street through traffic! It turns out it’s not as hard as it first seems, although a bit nerve-wracking for the newcomer, and I ended up walking back to my hotel after the course.

The course I took was called “Street Food”. And since taking it, I’ve had on my agenda making all of the recipes.. but haven’t gotten around to it until now. However, I’ve made great use of the grater the school so kindly gave me!

Some of the ingredients are not easy to find, such as good quality green papaya or banana blossom. I bought a banana blossom sometime last year at an Indian store, but was thoroughly disappointed when I cut into it and it was rotting. ;(

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(these are the dried, salted anchovies that I used)

But on our excursion to the Asian market this past week, we found green papaya and a whole plethora of other goodies! Therefore the first recipe I share with you from our Vietnamese adventure is Green Papaya Salad. I made a few alterations to keep it Paleo (no sugar and no peanuts) and added a couple of ingredients of my own, such as pomegranate seeds and created my own “fish sauce”.

I hope you enjoy!

Green Papaya Salad (Nom Xoai Xanh)
Recipe Type: Salad
Cuisine: Vietnamese
Author: The Saffron Girl
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • For Salad:
  • 1 green papaya (pawpaw), peeled and grated or spiralised
  • 2 green onions, finely sliced julienne style
  • 1 long Vietnamese chili, seeds removed and finely chopped (be careful they are very hot, so it’s wise to use some sort of gloves)
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced or cut julienne style
  • 1/2 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
  • seeds of one pomegranate
  • 3 tablespoons cashews, roasted and crushed*
  • 1 small red onion, very finely sliced
  • 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder
  • olive oil or other fat for frying
  • Dressing:
  • 1 tablespoon coconut sugar
  • 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons dried, salted anchovies or dried shrimp, fried
Instructions
  1. Peel the green papaya and with a spiraliser or grater, grate all of it until you’re getting close to the seeds. Place in a large bowl.
  2. Add the sliced green onions, the minced garlic, the Vietnamese chili, cilantro leaves, and pomegranate seeds. Toss and set aside.
  3. In a pan, add about 1 tablespoon of coconut oil over low heat.
  4. Fry the cashews until golden brown. Scoop them out and place on a plate with paper towels to soak up any extra fat.
  5. In the same remaining oil, fry the dried anchovies or shrimp. Scoop them out and also place on a plate with paper towels to soak up the extra fat and stay crispy.
  6. Clean the pan, when slightly cooled, with a paper towel and add new coconut oil or olive oil, enough to “deep fry” the sliced onion. Heat over medium heat.
  7. In a medium bowl, coat the sliced onion pieces with the arrowroot powder. Dust off any extra arrowroot powder with your hands.
  8. Once the oil is hot, carefully place the floured onions into the pan. Make sure to separate them before putting them in, or they’ll clump up.
  9. Allow to fry on one side before stirring/flipping to fry on the other side. (If you have a deep fryer, it’s easier to use that than a pan.)
  10. Scoop out of the pan and place on another plate with paper towels. Set aside and turn the oil off.
  11. In a mortar, place the fried anchovies/shrimp and grind with the pestle.
  12. Add the lime juice and coconut sugar and mix well. Set aside.
  13. Place the cashews on a flat surface, such as your counter top, and with the back side of a bowl, press into them, breaking them up into pieces. Scoop them up and place into a bowl. Set aside.
  14. When you’re ready to serve the salad:
  15. Toss the papaya mixture with the dressing and cashew pieces.
  16. Serve in individual plates or a large bowl and top with the fried onion pieces.

 

Roasted Summer Vegetables, Red Mullet & The Borough Market

Here’s the dish for this post… but first a little bit about my visit to the Borough Market in London….(you can skip to the bottom for the recipe).

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A few days ago, I visited the Borough Market in London with a fellow Paleo blogger, Ceri, from Natural Kitchen Adventures. I had been wanting to go for quite some time, but for some reason it just seemed too far a trip. It turns out it’s not and it’s quite easy to get to. In fact, for those of you in London, it’s literally right above the London Bridge tube station and very close to the Shard. One word of caution though: take a few bags (and plenty of money!), as you’ll want to buy everything in sight! 😉

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Ceri and I met in person last year and had been wanting to do a market outing together for some time; and now we finally got around to it. She has been to the market many times before and acted as an impromptu guide, showing me around the vegetable, butcher, fish monger and specialty stands.

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If you haven’t been, it’s a must see, even if you’re just a tourist in London. It’s really a beautiful market with mostly organic produce, grass-fed meats and wild caught fish. I honestly can’t speak much about some of the specialty shops, as I didn’t visit them. But there are a load of places selling pastry, chocolate and sweets and even organic muesli and cereal mixes. There’s also a Spanish shop with a wide variety of cheese (many unpasteurised), jamon serrano, salted cod, and other traditional foods. And there are plenty of places to eat, although most of them are not Paleo-friendly.

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On one of our turns around the stalls, we bumped into Hook & Son, a raw milk supplier and producer of raw cream, raw yoghourt, raw butter and raw buttermilk. I hadn’t had raw milk since I was a child in Spain, so it was quite a treat to sample it again. I must say, it’s so delicious and creamy! And it didn’t even bother my tummy. I’m lactose intolerant and regular, pasteurised milk sits like a bomb in my belly. Granted, I only had a little bit… but Ceri and I did share an apricot-flavoured, sugar-free yoghourt and loved it! What’s even cooler about Hook & Son is that there’s a British documentary that has been made called The Moo Man. Stephen Hook, the very friendly and informative farmer, who attended to all our queries, is the protagonist (along with his herd and family) of the film, which apparently was a surprise hit at the Sundance Film Festival 2013. I look forward to finding a screening near us, as it’s supposed to be a very interesting and heart-breaking love story of Mr. Hook’s journey to remain organic and preserve his herd and farm. I also look forward to finding the time to visit his farm. But in the meantime, the good thing about Hook & Son is that they deliver raw milk all over England and Wales! That’s quite exciting for me, as I want to make good quality kefir and pasteurised milk doesn’t cut it. (For more information on the film, please check: moomanmovie.com.)

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Anyway, at the market, we really had to struggle to control our shopping impulses. Everything is so beautiful. The fruits and vegetables look simply amazing and picture perfect. So much so, that I actually succumbed and bought a purple cauliflower, some yellow courgettes (zucchini), purple kale, and some figs, which were simply just too expensive, but I hope worth it!

As we were ready to leave, Ceri took me over to The Ginger Pig stand, a butcher, specialising in organic, grass-fed lamb, beef, pork and poultry. We kindly requested some beef bones for broth and the nice butcher gave us a bag full!

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It was not easy to leave the market, but at least we left happy and already brainstorming how to use our purchases…

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And here’s a recipe with the yellow courgettes that I bought. I used both the yellow and green ones I had previously on hand to add more colour to the dish. But you can make this with just the regular green ones, and also add in aubergines, if you like (I would’ve added them, but didn’t have any left).

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Roasted Vegetables with Red Mullet
Recipe Type: Main
Cuisine: Mediterranean
Author: The Saffron Girl
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 2
Serves 2.
Ingredients
  • 6-8 red mullet filets, depending on appetite and size of filets
  • 1 medium green zucchini (courgette), sliced diagonally to make larger “rounds”
  • 1/2 large yellow zucchini (courgette), sliced diagonally to make larger “rounds”
  • 2-3 medium tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 medium red onion, peeled and sliced
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, sliced lengthwise
  • Herbes de Provence
  • freshly ground rosemary
  • coarse sea salt
  • olive oil
  • balsamic vinegar
  • freshly chopped parsley
Instructions
  1. Rinse the fish filets and set on a paper towel over a plate. Sprinkle with some coarse sea salt and set aside.
  2. Prepare the vegetables.
  3. Preheat the oven at 180C (350F) while you set up the vegetables, as follows.
  4. In an ovenproof dish, alternate between the zucchini, tomato and onion pieces, layering until you have covered the dish and used up all the vegetables.
  5. Drizzle generously with olive oil and sprinkle some coarse sea salt over top.
  6. Sprinkle some Herbes de Provence (I used about 1-2 teaspoons) and some rosemary (I used about 1/2-1 teaspoon) over top.
  7. Place in the middle rack of the oven and cook for about 30-40 minutes until the zucchini are tender.
  8. Remove from the oven and drizzle with a little balsamic vinegar. Let sit a few minutes before serving to absorb the vinegar flavours.
  9. About 10 minutes before the vegetables are ready, you will need to cook the fish.
  10. Add some olive oil (about 2 tablespoons) in a pan and set the filets and garlic inside.
  11. Over low heat, cook the fish, turning over to cook each side, about 3-4 minutes on each side.
  12. (Red mullet filets shrink quite a bit and also may “shrivel” up. So, make sure to cook just long enough, but not overcook or it will be too dry.)
  13. Serve immediately with some freshly chopped parsley as garnish and the roasted vegetables as accompaniment.

 

Macau & African Chicken (Galinha a Africana)

On our recent trip to Vietnam, we had a day layover in Hong Kong on the way over and about a 12-hour layover on the way back. So, we took advantage of the time to visit with some friends who live in the area and to do a bit of sight-seeing. This is my second time in Asia and also my second time visiting both HK and Macau. The contrasts I observe I think will never cease to amaze me.

On the ferry from Kowloon to Mainland Macau

After landing in Hong Kong, we took the express train straight into Kowloon, where we had booked a hotel for the evening. We checked in, freshened up and headed for the ferry terminal. By the way on a side note, I still had my Octopus Card from about 6 years ago and it worked. The Octopus Card is like the Oyster Card in London, where you can top off as you go and use it for all the underground, busses and some ferries as well. However, one cannot use it for the ferry to Macau, or at least, we don’t think so.

Arriving in Macau

Arriving in Macau… first casinos are visible from the ferry

The journey over is about an hour from Kowloon to Macau. We learned, that since our last visit, there are new ferry lines now going to Taipa as well. Taipa is one of the two islands that along with the Mainland Macau make up this special administrative region. China took over Macau in 1999, after more than 400 years of Portuguese rule. One would think that after such a long time, more Macanese would speak Portuguese, after all it’s one of the official languages, it is still used in government buildings and all signs are in Portuguese, as well as Chinese. Yet, that’s not really the case. I had noticed this on my first visit here, and was again aware of this disparity when trying to communicate to the locals.

Our friend Mary, a Macanese, however speaks multiple languages, one of them being Portuguese. Mary picked us up at the Macau ferry terminal and we headed over one of the long bridges joining the region to Taipa to see the University of Macau, where my husband and she had studied about 12 years ago. The University, which will soon be transferred to mainland China, is located in a modern building on a hill. Most of Macau is made up of hills. And curiously one drives on the left here, just like in Hong Kong (in mainland China and Portugal, one drives on the right). From what we learned it seems that the reasons for this are purely economical rather than historical or cultural, since all cars are imported from Hong Kong.

Waterfront street near the Plaza of Sao Francisco Xavier

Same waterfront street

After a quick zip through the area, we headed over to Coloane, the second island, now joined to Taipa via a landfill. Coloane is also being colonized today, but in a new way. The region’s newest and largest casinos are prominently welcoming the visitor on what is the land-filled area, now called the Cotai Strip. In Coloane, one can still see vestiges of a Portuguese past in a laid back atmosphere, which is relaxing and inviting. It’s almost like stepping back in time. In fact, in the older areas of Macau, one feels like one is no longer in Asia (until the oppressive humidity and heat remind you otherwise) but somewhere on the streets of Lisbon or another part of Portugal. It’s truly a beautiful contrast.

Sao Francisco Xavier church and plaza

We parked along the water front, facing what is mainland China. Yet another contrast. It’s hard to imagine that across what seems like a little pond lies the big giant of the north and yet mainland Chinese are not allowed into Macau without special permission. Macau will remain a special administrative region until 2050, when it should be fully integrated into the rest of the country. And although that is not that far away, it is hard to fathom what type of changes could come about after integration, some maybe not so welcome.

Mary took us to the plaza of Sao Francisco Xavier, which is lined with Chinese restaurants on one side and Portuguese restaurants on the other. We chose a Portuguese one, facing the little church of Sao Francisco Xavier, where we enjoyed some traditional Macanese dishes, such as Bacalhau a Braz, Bok Choi in some special sauce (can’t recall) and African Chicken.  The three dishes are perhaps more symbolic than one would think at first. And they represent Macau’s history perfectly, which is a mixture of the Portuguese heritage, the Chinese roots and the influences of immigrants brought to China by the Portuguese, such as the African slaves.

Menu at the restaurant where we ate

Bacalhau a Braz and Bok Choi & Steamed Vegetables

African Chicken

Restaurant, where we ate

Part of the Plaza of Sao Francisco Xavier

After a delectable lunch, during which Mary had to rush off to get back to work, we strolled through the old parts of the village and then hopped on a bus to get back to Cotai, where we wanted to see what the Macanese version of the Venetian looks like (after all, one cannot come to Macau without visiting a casino, right?). The region’s economy is based on the gaming and tourism industries and it’s very quickly becoming the Las Vegas of Asia, with revenues tripling  those of its American counterpart.

Street in Coloane

Things we saw in Coloane

The Venetian and the other casinos on the Cotai Strip provide free shuttle busses to their sister casinos on Mainland Macau. So, we took advantage of this and went to the Sands casino, which is located across from the new shopping and recreation complex that is being built near the ferry terminal. The complex, when completed, will be amazing with stores, theaters, restaurants and attractions. Mary met us here again in the afternoon and whisked us away to tour the rest of the city. We went up Guia hill for a beautiful view of the city below.

Guia Lighthouse and Chapel – see the wedding couple being photographed?

View of Mainland Macau from the Guia Fortress

The Guia Fortress lighthouse and little chapel are a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as is the historical center of Macau. The fort and the chapel were built in the 1600s, with the lighthouse being constructed much later between 1864-65. It’s the first western style lighthouse to be built in east Asia. We were joined on our tour by couples taking their wedding pictures at the fort. It seems like it was the season for weddings on this trip, as I also witnessed many couples taking their wedding pictures, while in Ha Noi. 😉

One of the Portuguese colonial mansions in Mainland Macau

Garden in Mainland Macau

Commemorative plaque at the entrance of the gardens

The Macau Venetian casino, inside

Inside the Venetian

Chinese Pavilion & Koi Pond, part of the new shopping & entertainment complex

After our quick tour, as we needed to get back for dinner with other friends, we bid farewell to Mary and Macau, and boarded the ferry back to Hong Kong.

My African Chicken – Mi Galinha a Africana

AFRICAN CHICKEN (GALINHA A AFRICANA)

For the original recipe, click here.

Ingredients:

  • 1.5-2 kilos of chicken pieces or whole chicken, cut into pieces (I purchased drumsticks, as that’s all I found at Tesco’s)

For the Marinade:

  • 1 teaspoon chili powder (more or less according to how spicy you would like this; I for example didn’t use any)
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon pimenton (or paprika if you don’t have it)
  • 2 teaspoons Chinese 5-spice powder (a mixture of star anise, cinnamon, fennel, black pepper and cloves)
For the Sauce:
  • olive oil
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup garlic, minced (it’s about 1 head of garlic)
  • 1/4 cup sweet paprika
  • 1/4 cup pimenton
  • 3/4 cup grated coconut
  • 1/2 cup raw cashews (the original recipe calls for 2 tablespoons of peanut butter, as the peanuts are originally an African legume; feel free to substitute)
  • 1 1/2 cups water or chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup full fat coconut milk
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric

Chicken marinating

Process:
The night before, marinate the chicken pieces: mix all of the ingredients for the marinade together and rub into chicken. Place the chicken in a bowl or dish and cover with plastic wrap. Let the chicken marinate overnight. (The fridge will smell delicious every time you open it!)
Make the sauce:
1. Over medium heat, heat a few tablespoons of olive oil. When the oil is hot, add the raw cashews. Slightly brown and remove from heat. Scoop out the cashews with as little oil as possible and place in a mortar. With the pestle grind them finely. Set aside.

Ground cashew (pimenton from Spain in the background)

2. Heat about 1/4 cup olive oil in a saucepan or wok over medium to medium-low heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook until softened, about 5 minutes, stirring often so the garlic will not burn. Add the paprika, pimenton, coconut and turmeric and cook for another few minutes. Add the chicken broth or water, coconut milk, bay leaves and ground cashews. Simmer for 10 minutes over low heat. Remove the bay leaves. (The sauce can be made ahead of time, just warm up before finishing the dish.)
To Finish the Dish:
Preheat oven to 200C (about 400F). In a wok or large skillet, heat a few tablespoons of olive oil over medium to medium-high heat. Brown the chicken pieces on all sides. Once browned, transfer the chicken to an oven-proof dish and cover with the sauce. Bake for about 30 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked and the sauce is bubbly.
Traditionally, this dish is served with rice. However, I served it with a “salad” of quinoa, pomegranate and wild rocket leaves.

Ready to be served…

…and ready to be eaten… 😉

Quinoa, pomegranate and wild rocket “salad”

Vietnamese Coffee and First Impressions

It’s ironic how “they” always say that first impressions are the ones that count. I think it’s not really always true, or at least not always accurate…but here are mine of Vietnam.

When we landed, a car was waiting to pick us up to take us to the hotel. We were escorted in style with comfortable air-conditioning through a busy road lined by rice patties and fields. But as we drove, it was hard to soak in all the contrasting views. Here we were sitting in a luxury automobile with the driver and one of the concierge ladies from the hotel, with wifi included so we could get online or make a phone call (like we did on Skype to my parents), while outside there were a complex array of views passing by. The road was full of vespas and motorbikes, loaded with not only people (most wearing masks to protect against pollution and air contaminants) but everything you can imagine; the rice patties on the sides of the road brought images of a quintessential Asia seen in travel and history books; the houses looked like something out of a European fairy tale crossed with Indian or South American influence, with their very tall and many-storied look and colourful facades; and yet through this semblance of peacefulness, there is an underlying chaos all around with horns honking, fumes blowing out of cars and motorbikes, and even a water buffalo or two trying to cross the same road we were driving on.

Vietnam is a country trying to embrace and adapt to the modern world, yet it is riddled with a political system that would seem anything but Communist (everyone seems to be an entrepreneur) and a history that usually equates to invasions, suffering and wars. The Vietnamese seems like a strong and resilient people; a people with hope and hard-working ethics; and a people who want to bring their nation into the 21st century quicker maybe than they are really prepared for.

I couldn’t help but think all of this, and kept rehashing that only about 30 years ago, this country was at war, and one of the bloodiest and most tragic wars remembered in recent history. From a Vietnamese perspective, especially in the north, the latest war is called the American War, and was started by the invasion of the Americans. They have also been invaded on numerous occasions by China, from whom they have a rich historical legacy, and by the French.

But on the street, all that one sees is a frenetic kaleidoscope of colour, people, mopeds, and rapid movement, sprinkled with elements of an ancient culture, which is still very strongly pulsating.

So, my first impressions of this beautiful country were anything but orderly (what a contrast from “alles ist in Ordnung” mentality of the Germans!).  And to make matters a bit more disconcerting, I was suffering from jet lag and lack of sleep from our 12-hour flight from London and our little excursion into Macau (I’ll share about that soon, as well as a delicious recipe).

I was in serious need of sleep, but too excited to get any. And, so once at the hotel, I ventured out to see a pagoda and a temple along the West Lake of Hanoi.

I quickly learned that I should’ve gotten some rest, especially if I wanted to be lucid enough to remain alive on the streets. Crossing the road in Hanoi and Vietnam for that matter is a question of keeping calm, having a determination of steel, and carrying on…there are no rules of the road and very few traffic lights that are adhered to. Therefore, one must cross the street amidst hundreds of mopeds zooming by, other people crossing, and an incessant noise, as well as uncomfortable fumes lingering everywhere. I know a few friends back home, who probably wouldn’t venture out more than once in a chaos like this!

But being successful at the effort is definitely rewarding! There’s a magnificent world to be discovered if one does. The first pagoda I visited was Tran Quoc. It’s not the first one I’ve seen in my travels, but it was the first one in Vietnam. It’s quite impressive mostly because it’s on a little peninsula on the West Lake and is truly picturesque. I didn’t dare ask if photography was allowed, and simply started taking pictures and waited to be reprimanded. However, I never was and there were many other taking pictures, including locals. (I’m usually more respectful, mind you, but I was a bit tired to be coherent.)

After the pagoda, I walked along the tree-lined avenue to the end of the lake, where there was a temple to be discovered. Along the walk, locals were fishing with bamboo canes, selling exotic fruits and lounging around. It was all very peaceful, except it was constantly interrupted by the noise of all the mopeds driving by.

The Quan Thanh Temple dates from the 11th century and is one of the four sacred temples of Hanoi. Although it’s not as impressive as other temples, it’s worth a visit for its historical value, as well as being very close to the Ho Chi Mihn Mausoleum complex, which I realised a few days later when we visited that area.

Another important discovery, which helped me immensely with my jet lag and concentration is Vietnamese coffee! On my way back to the hotel, I just couldn’t keep my wits together any longer and had to stop for a strong dose of caffeine to wake me up. And wow, what a discovery! I love coffee. I love the aroma when it’s being ground and brewed. And although I could drink it more often than I regularly do, I don’t because I usually get very nervous with more than two cups. But Vietnamese coffee is different. It looks menacing with its dark colour, but as it’s a smoother version of Java, it’s easier on the nerves. Or at least, it seemed so to me.

The Vietnamese serve the coffee in a little cup brewer with condensed milk on the bottom. And although I’ve pretty much given up sugar, I couldn’t resist for two reasons: one, it was safer than drinking coffee with “fresh” milk; and two, it is simply delicious! And well, I must add a number three: I love anything different and drinking it as the locals do just made it more fun.

I had numerous Vietnamese coffees while in the country and even bought an individual brewer and some coffee. I just wish I would’ve bought a couple more brewers and also more coffee to last a while…

But fortunately, as the Vietnam Lonely Planet explains, Vietnamese coffee is exported all over the world. “The best grades are from Buon Ma Thuot and the beans are roasted in butter.” Maybe that’s the reason for the delicate aroma and smooth flavour? Additionally, LP points out, the following, which I didn’t pursue unfortunately, but found interesting: “Lovers of weasels and strange things should get their hands on ca phe chon (‘weasel coffee, No 8 of the signature Trung Nguyen brand). These coffee beans are fed to weasels first, then harvested from their droppings before being sold to you.” Ha! Now, that’s different alright! I, however, bought No 7 of the Trung Nguyen brand unknowingly, which probably has a less colourful process, but tastes just as delightful.

Over the course of the days we were in Hanoi, I managed to have at least two cups of coffee per day. And we even visited the Kinh Do Cafe, which is famous for being the setting of Catherine Deneuve’s morning coffee during the making of the film Indochine. If you’re in Hanoi, don’t bother, unless you’re a fanatic of the actress and want a picture of the film’s poster or are in the neighbourhood.  There are plenty of more inviting coffee shops in the city.

I did miss out on one opportunity though and that was trying caphe trung da, coffee with “a silky smooth beaten egg white” (and one could say a Vietnamese version of cappuccino)… so I had to try this at home and hope that it’s close to the original. 😉

CAPHE TRUNG DA

Ingredients:

1 cup of Vietnamese coffee

sweetened condensed milk to taste, or honey and milk to taste

1 egg white

Process:

Place a teaspoon or more of sweetened condensed milk or honey, if you prefer, in the bottom of the serving cup or glass.

Place the ground coffee in the Vietnamese brewer with piping hot water over a cup or glass. (If you do not have a brewer, use your regular coffee method to serve yourself a cup of coffee.) Allow all the water to pass through the brewer. (Add milk at this time as well.)

Beat egg white until stiff peaks form and place over the brewed coffee.  Serve immediately. Sprinkle with cinnamon or nutmeg if so desired.

(I have to admit that without the sweetened condensed milk, the flavour of the coffee is not the same. So, if you eat sugar, at least give this a try once the “real” way! ;-))

 

Dubai & Ginger Infused Strawberry and Celery Chilled Soup

View of Dubai, with early morning fog, from our hotel in Deira
I was disappointed today, as I planned on going out for a walk along the Thames. But the weather is not cooperating with me and I decided to stay indoors. Exercising outdoors in London means going out even in the rain and cold weather (even in the summer), but I’m from southern Spain and I am apprehensive when it comes to walking/running and getting all wet.
That got me to thinking that if I lived somewhere warm and with eternal sunshine like Dubai, I wouldn’t have that problem. But then again, in Dubai, people like to stay indoors to avoid the heat and humidity of the street! I guess one can never win….
We visited Dubai in September last year. As we arrived at our hotel in Deira, near the unfinished Palm Island, it was early morning around 6am and the heat was just starting to get intense. There was a light fog lingering over the city, which threatened to blur my sightseeing later in the day. It turns out that September has the highest humidity of the summer months because as sea temperatures have reached a peak in August, there is a tendency for warm, humid air to reach the coast. Fog is a regular occurrence during the early morning because of this warm air mixing with the cooler night temperatures.
However, we are die-hard travellers. So, heat and humidity were not going to stop us from exploring the city. Dubai is one of the seven United Arab Emirates on the Arabian Peninsula. It is probably the most well-known, as it is famous for the original Jumeirah Palm Island, the World Islands and also now the tallest building in the world, Burj Al-Khalifa. By the way, the Burj (tower) was going to be named Burj Dubai. But as the emirate was hit hard by the financial crisis, it had to be rescued by Abu Dhabi, one of the other seven emirates of the U.A.E. So, in honour of the Khalifa of Abu Dhabi, the tower’s name was changed to what it is today.
Dhows on The Creek
On our first day in Dubai, we explored the old part of town. Dubai is a trade city par excellence, acting as a broker between the East and West. The Creek, the waterway into the city from the Arabian Gulf (also known as Persian Gulf), is packed with cargo boats from Pakistan, Iran, Iraq, Oman, India, Yemen, Somailia and Sudan, with merchandise from these and other countries.
These boats, called dhows, are long, flat wooden vessels used typically in the Indian Ocean and the Arabian Sea to transport goods. They are a marvel to see and it is interesting to understand just how they stay afloat, when they do not look so sturdy and are precariously loaded with maybe several cars, a truck, and a warehouse’s worth of merchandise.
Passenger abra, traditional wooden water taxi
Passenger abra, crossing The Creek
Loaded dhow, leaving Dubai
Heading past the Dhow Wharfage, our first discovery was the Spice Souq. Ah.. I was in heaven! It is probably my favourite souq in Dubai and a walk through it, is a pleasure for the senses. The market is not a tourist attraction, but rather a working souq, so you can find many household things, such as glass and plastic containers, being sold here, alongside the exotic spices. We let our noses and eyes pave the path, as the pungent aromas lead the way.
The Spice Souq

Heading away from the souq, we stumbled onto some interesting streets, where all kinds of merchandise was being sold. We even found a shop with flamenca dresses!
Street, off of the Spice Souq, with other merchandise
(even flamenca dresses! – albeit rather ugly and outdated)
Wheelcarts, waiting to be used
As we started the day so early, we were ahead of any tourist crowds there could be. So, by the time we arrived at the Heritage House, it was just opening. The Heritage House is a renovated 1890s courtyard house that once belonged to Sheikh Ahmed bin Dalmouk, the founder of the Al-Ahmadiya School, which we also visited later. The house offers a unique opportunity to see how a rich pearl merchant lived.
Dubai’s pearl industry, which was the mainstay of its economy for centuries, died out in the early 1900s, in large part due to the Great Depression and the discovery by the Japanese of how to cultivate pearls artificially.  However, vestiges of this historical industry can still be seen today in parts of Deira, where the wealthy pearl merchants, fishermen, divers and others involved in the trade lived and worked. Many of the traditional wind towers have been restored, along with the houses, and can be viewed today, as part of the Shindagha Heritage Area, in Bur Dubai.
 Enjoying a short reprieve from the heat at the Al-Ahmadiya School
Lunch at the Afgan Kebab House, near the Naif Mosque
After a delicious and filling lunch, it was hard to get motivated in the intense humidity filled the streets of Deira. So, we headed to The Creek to walk along the waterside. There we hopped on a traditional wooden taxi, called an abra, and for just Dh1, we crossed to the other side to Bur Dubai. According to the Dubai City Guide, by Lonely Planet, 15,000 people cross the Dubai Creek each day on abras! It’s an interesting experience, especially since not too many tourist take these water taxis; so it’s a fun way to mingle with the locals. And since you’re at water level, it’s a cheap way to enjoy a much needed cool breeze and a lovely view of the wharfage and skyline.
Entrance of Silk Souq, in Bur Dubai
 Silk Souq, Bur Dubai
Wind tower, at Sheikh Juma Al-Maktoum House, in Bur Dubai
Lebanese cold mezzes at Shabetan Restaurant, inside the Radisson Blu Hotel
The next day, I explored on my own, as it was Sunday, the Islamic world’s Monday. First stop: Dubai Mall. In one word, WOW! It’s the world’s largest shopping mall, with 1200 stores, an aquarium, indoor amusement park, and an Olympic-sized ice rink! Dubai has a lot of “largest”, “tallest”, “most” appellatives, as it is trying its utmost to become the Las Vegas of the East, or the playground for the rich in the East. And Dubai Mall is just one example. The Dubai Aquarium & Underwater Zoo, inside the Dubai Mall, has the “world’s largest acrylic viewing panel”, as is recorded in the Guinness Book of Records.
 
 The cave/tunnel leading to the main building of the Aquarium, where you can come nose to nose with sharks, mantas, and other fish

Floor decor at the Dubai Mall 

 I’m sure you’ve seen this in the news!
 Me, with Burj Al-Khalifa in the background
Bloomingdale’s in Arabic!
Olympic-sized Ice Rink, inside the Dubai Mall

Attached to the Mall, and outside, is the Dubai Fountain, which has a spectacular water and light show in the evenings, and the Burj Al-Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. It’s quite an amazing view from the 124th floor, where the Observation Deck is located. In fact everything about it is amazing, even the full one minute it takes for the elevator to transport you up the 442m in the air to the public viewing area from the ground floor.
View from Observation Deck of the Burj Al-Khalifa

The following day, we explored bits of Jumeirah, which is the modern, newer area of Dubai, and where most of the “western” expatriates live. The poorer workers from Pakistan, India, and other parts of the world, live in Deira and less expensive areas.

Dubai is a city of adaptation, change and growth. When the pearl industry died out and oil was discovered, the city jumped on the bandwagon and evolved in part to what it is today. As the Dubai-tis are understanding that oil is not an unlimited resource, they are embracing the tourist, technology, film, and communication industries with fervor. You can see a lot of examples of this new path in the city’s growth in Jumeirah. 

One such example is the Jumeirah Mosque, which offers free tours and is the only mosque in Dubai that is open to non-Muslims. It almost seems like it was built for this purpose alone!

A lovely English lady, who told us she was married to a native Dubai-ti, and has been living in the Emirates for over 15 years, conducted the tour and educational piece for our group. We all had to take off our shoes and the women in the group had to cover their heads, with scarves. Luckily I had planned in advance, and had a scarf ready. But the mosque offers wraps for use inside to tourists who forget them. Photography is allowed and although I felt a bit disrespectful taking pictures, I did indulge in a few. We learned about Islamic religion and culture, as well as a bit of Dubai history. The U.A.E. is one of the most open Islamic countries in the world, and foreigners do not need to cover up. In addition, pork and pork products can be sold (to non-Muslims) and eaten in Dubai, as well as alcohol can be consumed by non-Muslims.

Jumeirah Mosque
 Jumeirah Mosque
Our group, inside Jumeirah Mosque
Digital clock, which states the time that the sun rises, and the five prayer times to be observed

Also in Jumeirah is the famous Burj Al-Arab, the iconic symbol of this ever-growing city. It is the sail-shaped building, home to a 5-star hotel (some people say it’s 7-star hotel, but that seems to be nonsense). It’s beautiful and alluring from the outside, as one approaches it along the causeway to the man-made island where it stand majestically. Inside, it’s a bit gaudy and glittery, but ever so impressive. As you cannot enter the hotel just to have a look, the only way in is to either stay there, of course, or book a reservation at one of the restaurants.
So, we booked Afternoon Champagne Tea. It wasn’t cheap, at about 80 USD per person, but we were left with little choice, as the rest of the options were even pricier. (By the way, according to the Lonely Planet edition we have, the tea consists of unlimited champagne, which is not the case. Only one glass is included in the price.)
The service and attention were exquisite. But then again, all service in Dubai is exquisite, except for maybe in the hustle and bustle areas of Deira. The views are magnificent. In fact, you can see the Jumeirah Palm Island from the Skyview Bar, where tea is served, and also other parts of Jumeirah Beach.
Cappuccino with 24-karat Gold Dust
Burj Al-Arab, as we left. The picture is blurry because my camera was trying to adjust to the hot and humid outside, after being indoors for hours!

After lingering as long as we could and were allowed, we headed back to our hotel for the night. On our way out, I tried to take some pictures of the impressive lighting on the building, but my camera lens couldn’t adjust to the hot and humid outside, after being indoors, in an air-conditioned place for so long! By the way, we were told at our hotel, that all the buildings must keep the air-conditioning on extra high, even when it is not so hot out, because the humidity causes condensation to occur, creating rain inside the buildings, if the a/c is not used! So, needless to say, one freezes inside and melts outside.

Mall of the Emirates, where Ski Dubai is located
Nice ride, waiting for its owner outside the Mall of the Emirates

On all my trips, I love to pick up literature that I find in the hotels and places we visit. On this particular trip, I picked up some magazines, which offered insight into the daily life of expatriates, as well as locals, in Dubai. Also, it had quite a few interesting recipes, one of which I’m sharing below.
As a side note: Arabic is written from right to left, and books and magazines, and the Qu’ran all open in reverse from their western counterparts. Magazines which are made for both audiences have two halves: one, as in the West, and then you flip the magazine around to read the Arabic version! Very creative.
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Ginger Infused Strawberry & Celery Chilled Soup
Ingredients
  • 2-3 tsp of olive oil
  • 15g of white onion, chopped
  • 2g of garlic, chopped
  • 200g celery sticks, cleaned, peeled and chopped
  • 400g of strawberries, cleaned
  • 220ml of cold water
  • 6ml ginger juice or 6g of fresh ginger, grated
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • celery leaves and/or physalis for garnishing (optional)
Process
In a pan, heat oil and saute onion, garlic and celery until soft. Add the strawberries and saute for a minute. Set aside to cool.
Place the mixture in a blender, add cold water and blend until you achieve a smooth consistency. Add ginger juice/grated ginger, salt and pepper.
Strain the soup using a fine strainer, if necessary, then pour into a bowl and chill in the refrigerator for 10 minutes.
To serve, pour the soup into small glasses and garnish with celery leaves and/or physalis or a simple grissini stick.
I recommend peeling the ginger with a spoon

London 2012 Olympic Games, and Holland Heineken House

It’s an amazing time to have the opportunity to be in London. Twenty-twelve has been full of excitement so far: the Diamond Jubilee and now the 2012 Olympic Games.
 Tower Bridge with the Olympic Rings

 Another view of the Tower Bridge, from the Tower of London
Penultimate Day of the Torch Relay
Since we moved here in January, we thought it would be tremendously hard to achieve tickets for the games, however, it hasn’t been at all. In fact, there are still tickets available to many events and for sale through the official website and also via the National Olympic Committee houses, such as the Holland Heineken House.
The Holland Heineken House is amazing! We attended the days events there yesterday and I couldn’t have been more impressed. The Dutch are fascinating people, who at the drop of a penny will dress up in orange, head to toe, if necessary, to show their support for their countrymen and patriotism. The Holland Heineken House is the “traditional meeting place for the various echelons of the Dutch sports world during the Olympic Games. It is the official, national house of the Netherlands where NOC*NSF (Netherlands Olympic Committee) is the host and where Heineken facilitates and organises the venue. Holland Heineken House started during Barcelona 1992.” Therefore this year, it celebrates 20 years of existence and support for the Dutch athletes, their families and countrymen.
NOS Live from the Holland Heineken House

At the venue, one can find not only Heineken, but other Dutch companies with booths, engaging the public and selling their merchandise, as well as a restaurant, food and drink kiosks, a music and dance hall, facilities for national television (RTL and NOS) and radio stations, reception rooms for sponsors and athletes, and a plethora of fun! During the day, we could watch the games live on big TV screens, enjoyed the excitement shared by everyone in the venue and even were surprised by the visit of Crown Prince Willem-Alexander and Crown Princess Maxima, who walked around and greeted the crowd.
Excited crowd, when Prince Willem-Alexander & Maxima arrive at the HHH
I’m not Dutch, but my husband is. And I must say I’m impressed by many things that the Netherlands does, and this is one of them on my long list.
 Holland Heineken House, at Alexandar Palace
 
Maxima & Willem-Alexander
An athlete signing autographs

Dutch spirit at the Holland Heineken House
Dutch RTL commentator, getting ready for the live show, in which we were lucky enough to participate 
The day before, Saturday, we attended our first Olympic event: Women’s Foil Fencing. We had never watched fencing in person, so it was very interesting and exciting to learn about the sport, its history, and how the competition takes place. From our seats, we were fortunate to view the previous Gold Medal fencer, the Italian Valentina Vezzali, who this year took Bronze.
We were impressed by the participant from Tunisia, Ines Bourbakri, who played a quarterfinal match against V. Vezzali and lost 7 to 8. What a way to show skill and training.
The way that the fencing competition works is three rounds of 3 minutes each, with the participant with the highest score wining, or whoever reaches 15 points first. We watched the first half of the day, which concluded with the quarterfinals.
China vs. Poland
Fencing has been present at the Olympic Games since 1896, the year of the first modern Olympic Games. From the London 2012 website, “Although sword fighting dates back thousands of years, fencing as we now understand it really came of age as a sport in the 19th century. A tense, compelling battle of wits and technique, the sport is one of the few to have featured at every modern Olympic Games”.
In today’s fencing, the participants have suits, helmets, and swords, which are electronically wired, so that it’s easier for the referees to distinguish between foiled and real attacks. The platform upon which they perform is also wired, so that the public can view which player wins a point. It’s a bit annoying to listen to all the beeps going on back and forth during the hours of matches. But it’s also very informative to be able to see what is really going on in front of us.
We had an exhausting, but electrifying (no pun intended ;0) half day at the fencing event!
And on Sunday, the Women’s Cycling competition literally swooshed nearby our house. So, we went to see it and take really quick pictures. The participant from the Netherlands, Marianne Vos, won the Gold Medal for her country. (We later helped celebrate this at our afternoon at the Holland Heineken House.)
 Part of the peloton
The arm of Marianne Vos, who won the Gold Medal
We are fortunate to be able to join in these historical celebrations and look forward to the rest of the Games! There are a number of side events, exhibitions, and festivities taking place as well, all part of London Festival 2012.
If you are in London or are coming to the city for the Games, don’t forget to check out everything the city is offering now!
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