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Chestnut-Cashew Chili Chocolate Chip Cookies

These are delicious, if I may say so myself! Really, they are. But I’ll let you be the judge, when you make them. The recipe is also a good starting point for experimenting with other flavourings and nut flour combinations.

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If you don’t like the Chili Chocolate Chips, make them without the chili, and add more honey to the cookie mixture. I personally like the sweet-spicy combo, as it provides an interesting and unexpected surprise in every bite!

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Chestnut-Chesnut Chili Chocolate Chip Cookies
Recipe Type: Dessert
Cuisine: Paleo
Author: The Saffron Girl
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 16
Makes 12
Ingredients
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil, solid
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon coarse sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup ground, raw cashews (or ground almonds)
  • 1 1/2 cups chestnut flour
  • 2 tablespoons coconut flour
  • 2 tablespoons raw honey (add more if you prefer sweeter cookies)
  • 1/3 heaping cup of chili chocolate chips*
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 180C (350F).
  2. In a mixing bowl, with a hand whisk beat the eggs, coconut oil, vanilla extract and sea salt until smooth.
  3. Add the baking soda, honey and flours and knead with hands until all ingredients are incorporated.
  4. Add the chocolate chips and mix well.
  5. Place on parchment lined cookie sheet in spoonfuls, about 1 1/2 inch wide.
  6. Press down with fingers, so that the cookies turn out “flatter” and “rounder”.
  7. Bake for 10-12 minutes.
  8. The cookies will be very soft to the touch right out of the oven.
  9. Allow to cook and harden before eating.
  10. They can be stored in the fridge for up to 4-5 days.

 

Chili Chocolate

It is known that the Mayans used to drink their chocolate with chili and unsweetened. The word “chocolatl” means “bitter drink”; and there’s evidence that it dates from about 2000 years BC! The original drink was the fermented, roasted and ground beans of the cacao.

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It was the Europeans who later added refined sugar and milk to create the chocolate drink we know today. Unfortunately, the old traditions of the “bitter drink” seem to be lost even in the areas where the Mayas lived, as most of the world has developed a sweet tooth. But now, with cacao butter being more readily accessible, we can somewhat replicate this beverage in our own homes!

Personally, I love dark, bitter chocolate and enjoy making my own. This recipe includes chili powder, but you can omit it and add other ingredients as you like, for example, cinnamon, vanilla, nutmeg, dried fruit pieces, nuts…whatever strikes your fancy! You can create chocolate “candy”, bars, “chips” or drink it alone or with some coconut or almond milk….

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If you prefer no sweetener at all, omit the honey. I’ve made it with and without, depending on the recipe with which I’m using the chocolate.

It chills nicely and keeps its form, but starts to melt quickly in warm temperatures. So, beware with handling it and getting chocolate fingers. 😉

Try this Chili Chocolate with my Chestnut-Cashew Chili Chocolate Chip Cookies (that’s a lot of C’s… ) for a great combination of sweet, spicy and healthy!

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Chili Chocolate
Recipe Type: Easy
Cuisine: Paleo
Author: The Saffron Girl
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Makes about 2 cups of “chips”.
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup grated cacao butter
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil, solid packed
  • 1/2 cup raw 100% cacao powder
  • 1/4 cup raw honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
Instructions
  1. In a saucepan, pour all the ingredients, except the chili powder.
  2. Over low heat, cook until the coconut oil and honey are melted, about 1-2 minutes.
  3. Mix well to ensure all the ingredients are homogenised.
  4. Remove from heat.
  5. Allow to cool, then add the chili powder and mix well.
  6. Pour into candy molds; or for rustic chips: pour onto a piece of parchment paper.
  7. Roll it up and freeze overnight.
  8. The chocolate will break into pieces as you open the parchment paper.
  9. Break into smaller pieces should you prefer.

 

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